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About the EU MRV Regulation

What main requirements are included in the EU MRV?

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All ship owners and operators will have to monitor and report the verified amount of CO2 emitted by their vessels (>5,000 GT) on voyages to, from and between EU ports. Information such as fuel consumption, cargo loads and energy efficiency parameters will also need to be provided. The main requirements are:
Develop a ship-specific Monitoring Plan and have it assessed by an accredited verifier (this is a one-off assessment).
Monitor and report ship emission data for annual reporting periods, and at the end issue a ship-specific Emission Report.
Then, on an annual basis, have the Emissions Report independently verified.
From 2019, the vessel shall continuously carry a Document of Compliance (DOC) on board.

Which ships are in the scope of the EU MRV regulations?

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The EU MRV is applicable for ships >5,000 GT and for each voyage to, within and from EU (and EFTA) ports. Exempted are warships, naval auxiliaries, fish-catching or fish-processing ships, wooden ships of a primitive build, ships not propelled by mechanical means or government ships used for non-commercial purposes. Furthermore, it is not applicable for ship movements and activities not serving the purpose of transporting cargo or passengers for commercial purposes, such as dredging, ice-breaking, pipe laying or offshore installation activities.

What is the definition of “cargo carried” for the different ship types?

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Passenger ship (“Passenger ship” means a ship that carries more than twelve passengers but not cargo.): No. of passengers (as defined in MRV Reg. 2016/757, Annex II, § A.1.[d])

Container ship (“Container ship” means a ship designed exclusively for the carriage of containers in holds and on deck.): Mass (as defined in MRV Reg. 2016/757, Annex II, § A.1.[f])

Oil tanker (“Oil tanker” means a ship constructed or adapted primarily to carry oil in bulk in its cargo spaces. Note that this definition does not include combination carriers, NLS tankers or gas tankers.): Mass

Chemical tanker (“Chemical tanker” means a ship constructed or adapted for the carriage in bulk of any liquid product listed in chapter 17 of the International Bulk Chemical Code (a chemical tanker) or a ship constructed or adapted to carry a cargo of noxious liquid substances in bulk (an NLS tanker).): Mass

LNG carrier (“LNG carrier” means a tanker for the bulk carriage of liquefied natural gas (LNG) (primarily methane) in independently insulated tanks. Liquefaction is achieved at temperatures down to -163°C.): Volume (and its aggregation of part loads)

Gas carrier (“Gas carrier” means a tanker for the bulk carriage of liquefied gases other than LNG.): Mass

Bulk carrier (“Bulk carrier” means a ship which is intended primarily to carry dry cargo in bulk, including such types as ore carriers as defined in SOLAS chapter XII, regulation 1, but excluding combin-ation carriers.): Mass

Combination carrier (“Combination carrier” means a ship designed to load 100% dead weight with both liquid and dry cargo in bulk.): Mass

General cargo ship (“General cargo ship” means a ship with a multi-deck or single-deck hull designed primarily for the carriage of general cargo.): DWT carried (as defined in MRV implementing act, without fuel on board)

Refrigerated cargo ship (“Refrigerated cargo carrier” means a ship designed exclusively for the carriage of refrigerated cargoes in holds.): Mass

Vehicle carrier (“Vehicle carrier” means a multi-deck, roll-on roll-off cargo ship designed for the carriage of empty cars and trucks.): Mass (actual mass or as units occupied multiplied by default values for their weight)

Ro-ro ship (“Ro-ro ship” means a ship designed for the carriage of roll-on roll-off cargo transportation units or with roll-on roll-off cargo spaces.): In essence: Mass no. of cargo units (trucks, cars, etc.) or lane-metres multiplied by default values for their weight (Annex B, EN 16258 [2012])

Ro-pax ship (“Ro-pax ship” means a passenger ship with roll-on roll-off cargo space.): 1. No. of passengers and 2. Mass

Container / ro-ro cargo ship (“Container/ro-ro cargo ship” means a hybrid of a container ship and a ro-ro cargo ship in independent sections.): Volume (occupied deck area multiplied by deck height and added by container volume)

Other ship types (“Other ship types” mean ships not covered by any of the above definitions which fall under the scope of the regulation.): Mass or, DWT carried

Is the EU MRV only focusing on CO2 or also other emissions like NOx or SOx?

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The EU MRV is only focusing on CO2 emissions.

Does the EU MRV also cover CO2 emissions from a ship in port or at berth?

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Yes, CO2 emissions in EU ports, including emissions arising from ships at berth or moving within a port, should also be covered and need to be reported separately.

What is a “voyage”? What is the exact starting and ending point of voyages?

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The EU MRV regulation applies a berth-to-berth concept for voyages. Hence, a voyage starts at berth and ends at berth. Sailing with a pilot and/or anchoring while waiting for port entrance are considered to be part of the voyage. However, the time spent at sea shall be calculated based on port departure and arrival information and shall exclude anchoring.

Is a port call for bunkering considered the last port of call before calling at an EU port or the first port of call after leaving an EU port?

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No, only port calls where either cargo is loaded or unloaded, or where passengers embark or disembark, are considered port of call. Consequently, stops for the sole purpose of refuelling, obtaining supplies, relieving the crew, going into dry dock or making repairs to the ship and/or its equipment, as well as stops in port because the ship is in need of assistance or in distress, stops for ship-to-ship transfers carried out outside ports and stops for the sole purpose of taking shelter from adverse weather or rendered necessary by search and rescue activities are excluded.

What does the expression “port of call under the jurisdiction of a member state” mean pursuant to the MRV shipping regulation? What is an EU port in this context?

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The EU MRV regulation has been included in the EEA agreement pending constitutional requirements by Iceland. Therefore, this implies that all references in the MRV shipping regulation to member states should be interpreted as including EEA states (EU member states, Iceland and Norway).
Some territories belonging to EU member states are not considered EU territories according to the treaty of accession of the respective member state. As a consequence, ports located in these territories are considered non-EU ports in terms of the MRV shipping regulation. Territories which are not considered EU territories, and thus non-EU ports, are Greenland and the Faroe Islands, French Polynesia, Mayotte, New Caledonia, Saint-Barthélemy, Saint Pierre and Miquelon, Wallis and Futuna, Aruba, Bonaire, Saba, Sint Eustatius, Curaçao, Sint Maarten, Anguilla, Bermuda, British Antarctic Territory, British Indian Ocean Territory, British Virgin Islands, Cayman Islands, Falkland Islands, Bailiwick of Guernsey, Isle of Man, Jersey, Montserrat, Pitcairn, Henderson, Ducie and Oeno Islands, Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha, South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands, Turks and Caico Islands, Akrotiri and Dhekelia. It should further be noted that a port call at Spitzbergen (Svalbard) is also not considered a EU MRV relevant port call.

Data only need to be collected annually, is that correct?!

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No, relevant data need to be recorded and aggregated on a voyage basis and, subsequently, also aggregated annually. An exemption is applied to vessels which conduct more than 300 voyages per year and all voyages during this year either start from or end at an EU port. These vessels are excluded from reporting on a per-voyage basis and only have to record and report annual data sets.

MRV compliance

What happens if my ship changes class or flag?

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The EU MRV is neither class nor flag related, so this will have no effect on the EU MRV reporting.

Is the EU MRV verification related to class?

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No, DNV GL can also perform the verification for ships not classed with DNV GL.

What is the process if a ship operator decides to call at an EU port for the first time after 31 August 2017?

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The company shall submit a Monitoring Plan to the verifier (DNV GL) without undue delay and no later than two months after each ship’s first call at a port under the jurisdiction of an EU member state.

What should/could I do now to prepare for the IMO DCS (and not only the EU MRV)?

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As the details on the IMO DCS scheme are still pending, it is difficult to present a clear picture. We expect the the amendment of the SEEMP, which will then also require approval by the flag state or a recognized organization, requires some effort, but does not come along with major difficulties. But certainly we recommend our customers to take a look at the IMO DCS requirements as drafted per today when choosing and implementing a monitoring and reporting solution. This will help to make sure that the required data are already captured. DNV GL will inform its customers once further information on the IMO DCS is available.

Who is responsible for EU MRV compliance?

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The company is responsible for EU MRV reporting and is defined as follows: “Company” means the ship owner or any other organization or person, such as the manager or the bareboat charterer, which has assumed responsibility for the operation of the ship from the ship owner. So, in most cases, it will be the DoC holder.

When a ship changes company (owner/manager) through the year (as the ship is monitoring its emission) – how is this handled?

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Where there is a change of company, the new company shall ensure that each ship under its responsibility complies with the requirements of the MRV in relation to the entire reporting period during which it takes responsibility for the ship concerned.

Which companies are accredited for EU MRV verification?

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DNV GL is – together with a handful of other companies - accredited to verify compliance of monitoring plans and emission reports towards the EU Monitoring, Reporting and Verification regulation.

If a ship is calling at an EU port for dry docking or repair only, is this voyage MRV-relevant?

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No, stops for the sole purpose of refuelling, obtaining supplies, relieving the crew, going into dry dock or making repairs to the ship and/or its equipment, as well as stops in port because the ship is in need of assistance or in distress, stops for ship-to-ship transfers carried out outside ports and stops for the sole purpose of taking shelter from adverse weather or rendered necessary by search and rescue activities are excluded.

DNV GL support

Where can I find the MRV Ready App?

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Answer:

Please login to My DNV GL. If you are not yet a registered user, please fill in the registration form. After your login, please click “Add service” and select the "MRV Readiness Check" app in the list. Now you can add this service to your account and start the MRV Ready Assessment.

Send your enquiry Be prepared for the EU MRV Regulation with DNV GL Get in touch with an expert

Select your FAQ topic:

EU MRV Regulation
Monitoring Plan/App
Reporting
Interface
THETIS
EU MRV vs IMO DCS