Power and renewables

Working towards compliance

Smart Green Cities USA

Impact of EPA's 111(d) on state regulators and utilities

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Working towards compliance

Working towards compliance

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Whitepaper

Working towards compliance

About:

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Working towards compliance

Request a copy

Fill out the form below to receive a free copy by email

(optional)
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Please note that by subscribing to updates, newsletters and other regular email distributions, you must be opted in to receiving informational emails from DNV GL. By submitting this form, you agree to this and accept that you are opted in, and you understand that you can opt-out at any time using the links in the email you receive as well as visiting the email preference centre.

EPA’s proposed regulations of carbon dioxide emissions under the “The Clean Power Plan” calls for emission reductions from existing fossil fuel-fired electric generating units of 30 percent by 2030, compared to 2005 levels. EPA proposes to achieve these reductions through four building blocks: heat rate improvements; increased dispatch of natural gas combined cycle units; increased reliance on renewable and nuclear generation; and increased end-use energy efficiency.

The proposed regulation has triggered 1.6 million responses filed during the June-December 2014 public comment period. Judging from these responses, the review from both regulators and the industry is mixed, and it is clear that much remains to be done before workable regulations are in place across the United States. In addition to a myriad technical concerns, many stakeholders question EPA’s regulatory authority to mandate the proposed actions. This is likely to trigger extensive political, regulatory and legal debates, leading to delayed implementation.

The Clean Power Plan introduces the most significant environmental reform to the power industry since the Clean Air Act of 1970. Power plant owners will need to devise a strategy for controlling compliance costs and identifying growth opportunities. Based on this, they need to determine the best regulatory strategy at the state and federal level.

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Working towards compliance

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